Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from July, 2018

Inspiration for creating cards

Hello fellow card makers!

Like most of you, I find inspiration by looking at other handmade cards - I'm sure some of you have given me loads of inspiration. But recently, I have tried to think outside the box and look for inspiration in the unexpected.

While dining out with my family at a Chinese restaurant, I noticed a piece of wall art. I don't think the piece is anything special but I did get inspired for a new card design. Below, the first image is the wall art (sorry its so blurry) and the second image is the card I made from that inspiration.  What do you think?



I made the frame with black mirror cardstock. It adds a nice shine to the card. I used two rectangle nesting dies from Spellbinders to make the frame. Then I cut four - 1/8" wide strips and adhered them to the frame with each piece slightly larger than the frame.

I wanted the card to be almost 3D. I think dimension really adds interest. I used dimensionals under the black frame, the white panel and the vase.…

Stretching Your Dies For Stunning Results

Hello fellow stampers and card makers!

I will admit, I am addicted to die cutting. There are so many die sets and bundles on the market its sometimes hard to see beyond what the dies were originally designed to do. Well that's easier to do than you think.


For this first communion card, I mixed and matched several brands and designs to make a stunning focal point.

I used white and gold shimmer paper although its hard to tell from the photo. It's not necessary to use shimmer paper but it does make the card that much more special and elegant. On top of the base card, I layered a slightly smaller lavender piece that I had dry embossed. Using a slightly smaller white piece, I die cut the ornate oval (Spellbinders). For the chalice, I used a circle die from Stampin' Up. I cut the top 1/3" off to made the bottom. The host above the chalice is done using two sizes of circle punches.


The finishing touches include embossing the sentiment in gold which was cut using a banner pun…

Tarnished Metal Masculine Birthday Card Tutorial

Hello fellow stampers and card makers!

I am in love with this technique! Doesn't the background look like tarnished metal?

I think this technique is perfect for masculine cards - this one is a birthday card but you could make it work for any sentiment. It's so much easier than it looks and is sure to impress your friends and family.

Here's what you will need:

embossing foldermirror cardstock - gold, silver, or copper2 - embossing powder colorsStazon black inkpadVersamark pen For this card, I used silver mirror cardstock with gold and copper embossing powder. Any combination works, just use what you have. The background is made with a clock embossing folder. Tip: when dry embossing with mirror cardstock use a thinner sandwich in your die cutting machine.  Thicker sandwiches will press the folder too much causing the paper to tear. Once the paper is embossed, take the Stazon inkpad and lightly drag the ink across the raised images.  This gives it an aged look.
Make sure to dr…

Mountain Scene Card Tutorial

Hello fellow stampers,

I can admit, I cannot draw or paint freehand. But I have found that I can get a realistic scenic image using sponges and torn post-it paper.

Here's another sponged background card that I made for a friends recent loss. I think the color combinations and images made the scenic view seem almost peaceful.


For this card, I wanted a setting sun. I first tore mountain shapes out of post-it paper. The trick here is to use the positive and the negative pieces. Use the negative pieces to sponge the mountains and positive pieces to sponge the sky.

On this card, I chose a setting sun but a night time scene with a full moon would look just as awesome. To create the sun, I used a circle punch with post-it paper. I masked off the mountain using the positive piece of post-it paper so the sun looks like its setting behind the mountain. To create the sky, start with the lighter colors closest to the sun and gradually add darker shades as you sponge towards the opposite edge.